Equine Therapy – Is it all horse talk?

Here at Solent Youth Services, we aim to provide an affordable equine based therapy for our clients which will run alongside other therapeutic approaches.

For centuries, the bond between humans and animal has proven to be effective in creating an emotional and healing bond. Known as “hippotherapy”, horses are able to be used as therapy to reach their patients on a personal level. Equine therapy is highly successful due to the motor, emotional, and sensory stimulations that come with being around horses. This is particularly beneficial when used in conjunction with other therapeutic approaches for children with autism.

Equine Therapy helps individuals to develop both natural and core skills needed to function in society. Unfortunately, equine therapy still falls into the category of one of the most expensive therapies available for autistic children, with parents often finding themselves paying excessive amounts for its benefits.

Here at Solent Youth Services, we aim to provide an affordable equine based therapy for our clients which will run alongside other therapeutic approaches.

Autistic children often have a difficulty bonding emotionally to others, making it difficult sometimes for the child to make eye contact, communicate what they are feeling, or express themselves to others.

Equine therapy allows the person to experience a physical rather than verbal communication, with the horses. Through engaging through learning to care for the horse, they associate the care they provide with feelings and an emotional bond is formed. This bond can lead to social and communication skill production with other people in their lives.

Cognitive and language skills are developed through fun activities around horses, as well as a wealth of sensory benefits. Balance and spatial orientation are experienced through the vestibular sense organs. These are located inside the inner ear and are stimulated through direction change, incline, and speed. Riding a horse and caring for it, helps liven these sensory receptors, which helps make therapy exciting, motivating and engaging.